Farmers: Participate in U of S Crop Rotation Survey

Posted on October 17, 2017

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Dr. Stuart Smyth, Assistant Professor in the Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics, College of Agriculture and Bioresources, University of Saskatchewan, is seeking Saskatchewan farmers to participate in a set of crop rotation surveys.

Crop producers are stewards of the land, yet that is not always the image the public sees. The surveys are designed to gather data regarding how producers have adopted new practices within the industry and their impacts on the environment. Survey results will be communicated to politicians and government policy makers.

Register today to participate in all four surveys, in our effort to benchmark producers seeding and land management practices, fertilizer applications, use of tillage, and chemical/pesticide use. Producers will be asked to record a full crop rotation ending in 1994 and their most recent rotation ending in 2015. Such information will allow Dr. Smyth and his researchers to calculate the changes made in greenhouse gases, carbon emissions, and other environmental factors such as changes in soil erosion, chemical and fuel, and adoption of innovation.

Why is it important for farmers to participate?
The intent of the survey is to boost the voice of the Saskatchewan farmer. Through the collection of data, we can help to share with producers and policy makers the environmental and sustainable initiative producers take. Canada is expected to increase its commitments in regards to climate change, and that means each industry will be asked to make changes. A collection of crop producer data from across the nation can be used to advocate for policy which best fits the current Canadian crop industry. Without a collection of data, there is no one clear advocate for the crop production, making it more difficult for policy makers to put forward new crop regulations which are well suited for the industry and not a negative cost to producers. 

Sign-up to join the survey panel today!

 

Click here to participate

 

 

Savannah Gleim
Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics, University of Saskatchewan